mercredi 23 mai 2018

SENSITIVE CHAOS: Walking a Beautiful World (2018)

“Rich and creative in all aspect, this is a travel diary into sounds and tones”
1 Dreaming Helsinki Esplanadi
   (Walking a Beautiful World) 6:58
2 Missing Viejo 7:13      3 Jomo Jet Lag 1:14
4 Bad Ass Nairobi Land Rover 6:35
5 Rain Falls Down Like an Ocean in the Sky 8:01
6 Gift Hill Respite 1:00
7 Takeshita Street vs. the Jeepney 6:41
8 Mercado San Telmo 4:31
9 Spirits Between Bourbon and Royal 5:01
10 Hypnotica Muríca 10:22
11 Last Day Song (World Walking Again) 5:10
12 Rain Falls Down Like an Ocean in the Sky (Radio Edit) 7:04

Subsequent Records|SR008-02 (CD 69:44)
(Electronic Folk)
====================================
  
**Chronique en français plus bas**
====================================
With time, I eventually became a true fan of Sensitive Chaos. Nevertheless, this Jim Combs' project is at light years of the Berlin School model, even if it's essentially built around synthesizers and beat-boxes. Mixed adequately to more conventional instruments, such as guitars and bass, and to acoustic instruments such as trumpet, harmonica, saxophone and violin, this electronic music reaches another level which becomes even more surprising when the targeted styles go from Jazz to Folk with a touch of American Southwest's spirit. In fact, it's the very eclectic side of the Pacific School model but with a more cheerful vision and where some essences of Robert Rich and Forrest Fang drag melancholy and creativity beyond what one could imagine. “Walking a Beautiful World” is a 9th album and especially a diary travel in sounds and tones that Jim Combs made around the globe these last years. Inspired by meetings with people of Finland and Europe, as well as from South America, from Africa, Asia and finally from his home in the region of Atlanta, the sound troubadour with thousand ideas returns with an album as surprising as his long journey. And his immense bunch of guest artists gives as many colors as emotivism to a superb immensely musical album.
This tone so crystalline of Sensitive Chaos slits the silence with hesitating arpeggios which connect to another keyboard and to a suspended rivulet of electronic arpeggios which glitters adrift. The electronic envelope spreads its influence made of charms and surprises to percussions of which the acoustic gallops run to support the Chinese harmonies of Josie Quick's violin. Light and lively, "Dreaming Helsinki Esplanadi (Walking a Beautiful World)" proposes the work of three synthesists (Jim Combs, Tony Gerber and Otso Pakarinen) who court, by presenting miscellaneous tones of wind instruments, a violin which knows skillfully how to measure its emotions. "Missing Viejo" is a first crush here with a rhythm structured well on a good work of percussions. The electronic and acoustic ingredients melt themselves in a very musical sound mass where Dave Coustan's trumpet does very Mark Isham. We stamp of the foot, the bass is also very good, and we enjoy this meshing of electronic and acoustic instruments which get lost in our imagination. Is it a synth? A saxophone? A violin? All living with a symbiosis of the most melodious. The electronic effects of "Jomo Jet Lag" throw themselves into "Bad Ass Nairobi Land Rover" and whose ambiospherical road goes slowly towards a fascinating and very bucolic Southern Rock. Each album of Sensitive Chaos possesses its pearl. "Rain Falls Down Like an Ocean in the Sky" is the one of “Walking a Beautiful World”. A wonderful ballad in a musical texture full of new developments, at the level emotion, where all the instruments converge on an ear-catchy, because of its intensity, electronic Folk.
"Gift Hill Respite" proposes a very ethereal introduction to "Takeshita Street vs. the Jeepney". And running away from a sound romance gone up on a bed of carillons, this title proposes a spasmodic structure forged with rhythmic arpeggios and with percussions sometimes sober and sometimes livened up by a desire to blow up a rhythmic proposal which increases its depth with Ryan Taylor's good bass. His guitar also scatters its musing, more present than the discreet violin, on this tight meshing which flows like a rivulet of clanic trance. A convincing and very catchy surprise! "Mercado San Telmo" is another cheerful hymn where a street of New Orleans gets embellish of festive music. The violin and Brian Good's soprano saxophone have a great time on a purely electronic structure where the chords and the riffs of synth play with our sense of hearing like the uncertain steps of a cat a little bit drunk. "Spirits Between Bourbon and Royal" is a surprising title which reminds us in of a good Beck. The mixture of Funk and Folk, with riffs of rather cosmic guitar, shines here with a sound aestheticism as complex as very catchy. The bass is more vicious than the collection of jerky riffs of the guitar. "Hypnotica Muríca" is a strange title, a little like a music without identity, which could be as well produced by Beck or by Brian Eno in Nerve Net. The music is rich and the tonal aestheticism make a good menu for my Tribe Tower. Funk and Southern Rock, with an approach of collective joy, the rhythm skips with the cawings of a bass and a series of very acid riffs which forge a jerky and bipolar tempo. Voices of a man and of a girl decorate a panorama very near a psychedelic without borders with sound effects which abound around the violin which crumbles some American patriotic airs and a very rock guitar of the former 70's. On a structure of circular rhythm which hops up and down with hundreds of crazy steps, and which gets back constantly, "Last Day Song (World Walking Again)" offers a melodious ritornello with a very creative synth at the level of its choice of flute. It's Sensitive Chaos at its purest level with an approach of minimalist tornado which swallows all the sounds on its passage. When I told you that "Rain Falls Down Like an Ocean in the Sky" is the pearl of this album …The gang of Jim Combs even made a radio edit version. A way as another one to hear this wonderful title twice rather than one and which is taken from a “Walking a Beautiful World” rich and creative at every level. A top notch album my dear Jim!

Sylvain Lupari (May 21st,2018) ****¼*
synth&sequences.com
You will find this album on Sensitive Chaos web shop

===============================================================================
CHRONIQUE en FRANÇAIS
===============================================================================
Avec le temps, j'ai fini par devenir un inconditionnel de Sensitive Chaos. Pourtant, ce projet de Jim Combs est à des années-lumière du modèle Berlin School, même si elle est construite essentiellement autour des synthétiseurs et des boîtes à rythmes. Mélangés adéquatement à des instruments plus conventionnels, tels que guitares et basse, et à des instruments acoustiques tels que trompette, harmonica, saxophone et violon, cette musique électronique atteint un autre niveau qui devient encore plus étonnant lorsque les styles ciblés vont du Jazz à du Folk avec une touche du Sud-Ouest américain. En fait, c'est le côté très éclectique du modèle de la Pacific School mais avec une vision plus enjouée où des parfums de Robert Rich et Forrest Fang traînent mélancolie et créativité au-delà de ce que l'on pourrait imaginer. “Walking a Beautiful World” est un 9ième album et surtout un journal de voyage en sons et en tons que Jim Combs a effectué autour du globe ces dernières années. Inspiré par des rencontres avec des habitants de la Finlande et de l'Europe, de même que de l'Amérique du Sud, l'Afrique, l'Asie et finalement chez lui dans la région d'Atlanta, le troubadour sonique aux milles idées revient avec un album aussi étonnant que son long voyage. Et son immense brochette d'artistes invités donne autant de couleurs que d'émotivité à un splendide album immensément musical.
Cette tonalité si cristalline à Sensitive Chaos fend le silence avec des arpèges hésitants qui se connectent à un autre clavier et à un ruisselet d'arpèges électroniques suspendu et qui miroite à la dérive. L'enveloppe électronique étend son emprise constituée de charmes et de surprises
avec des percussions dont les galops acoustiques courent afin de soutenir les harmonies chinoises du violon de Josie Quick. Léger et entrainant, "Dreaming Helsinki Esplanadi (Walking a Beautiful World)" propose le travail de trois synthétistes (Jim Combs, Tony Gerber et Otso Pakarinen) qui font la cour, en présentant divers tonalités d'instruments à vents, à un violon qui sait habilement doser ses émotions. "Missing Viejo" est un premier coup de cœur avec un rythme bien structuré sur un beau travail de percussions. Les ingrédients électroniques et acoustiques se fondent en une masse sonore très musicale où la trompette de Dave Coustan fait très Mark Isham. On tape du pied, la basse est très bonne aussi, et on apprécie ce maillage d'instruments électroniques et acoustiques qui se perdent dans notre imagination. Est-ce un synthé? Un saxophone? Un violon? Tous cohabitant avec une symbiose des plus mélodieuses. Les effets électroniques de "Jomo Jet Lag" se jettent dans "Bad Ass Nairobi Land Rover" et dont la route ambiosphérique aboutira vers un fascinant Southern Rock très bucolique. Chaque album de Sensitive Chaos possède sa perle. "Rain Falls Down Like an Ocean in the Sky" est celle de “Walking a Beautiful World”. Une superbe ballade dans une texture musicale pleine de rebondissements, au niveau émotion, où tous les instruments convergent vers un séduisant Folk électronique.
"Gift Hill Respite" propose une introduction très éthérée à "Takeshita Street vs. the Jeepney". Et fuyant une romance sonique montée sur un lit de carillons, ce titre propose une structure spasmodique forgée avec des arpèges rythmiques et de percussions tantôt sobres et tantôt animées d'un désir de faire exploser une proposition rythmique qui alourdit sa profondeur avec la bonne basse de Ryan Taylor. Sa guitare éparpille aussi ses rêveries, plus présentes que le discret violon, sur cet étroit maillage qui coule comme un ruisselet de transe clanique. Étonnement convaincant et très accrocheur! "Mercado San Telmo" est un autre hymne de fête où une rue de la Nouvelle-Orléans se décore de musique festive. Le violon et le saxophone soprano de Brian Good s'en donnent à cœur joie sur une structure purement électronique où les accords et les riffs de synthé jouent avec notre ouïe comme les pas incertain d'un chat un peu saoul. "Spirits Between Bourbon and Royal" est un titre étonnant qui nous fait penser à du bon Beck. Le mélange de Funk et de Folk, avec des riffs de guitare assez cosmique, rayonne ici d'un esthétisme sonore aussi complexe que très séduisant. La basse est plus vicieuse que la collection de riffs saccadés de la guitare. "Hypnotica Muríca" est un titre étrange, un peu comme une musique sans identité, qui pourrait être aussi bien produite par Beck ou par Brian Eno dans Nerve Net. La musique est riche et l'esthétisme tonal font bien paraître mes Tribe Tower. Funk et Southern Rock, avec une approche de défoulement collectif, le rythme sautille avec des croassements de basse et une série de riffs très acides qui forgent un tempo saccadé et bipolaire. Une voix d'homme et de petite fille ornent un panorama très près du psychédélique sans frontières avec des effets sonores qui abondent autour du violon qui émiette des airs patriotiques américains et une guitare très rock ancien aussi fougueuse que dans les années 70. Sur une structure de rythme circulaire qui trépigne de cents pas fous, et qui revient en boucles, "Last Day Song (World Walking Again)" offre une ritournelle mélodieuse avec un synthé très créatif au niveau de son choix de flûte. C'est du Sensitive Chaos de ce qu'on connaît le mieux avec une approche de tornade minimaliste qui avale tous les sons sur son passage. Quand je vous disais que "Rain Falls Down Like an Ocean in the Sky" est la perle de cet album…La gang à Jim Combs en a même fait une version pour la radio. Une façon comme une autre d'entendre ce splendide titre deux fois plutôt qu'une et qui est tiré d'un “Walking a Beautiful World” riche et créatif à tous les niveaux. Un superbe album mon cher Jim!

Sylvain Lupari 21/05/18

Aucun commentaire:

Publier un commentaire