mardi 10 mai 2011

JEFFREY KOEPPER: Quadranteon (2009)

There are a lot of sounds reminiscences that cross my ears while I’m the intro of Quadranteon Part I. From No Man’s Land (TD’s Hyperborea) to Equinox (JM Jarre), Quadranteon’s intro starts on cosmic fragrances which wave such as auroras borealis and roll such as waves to starred meerschaum. Hard to catch? Well that’s the musical world of Jeffrey Koepper. That’s a soft intro with slow scented oscillations of synth breezes which mould a sweet and progressive rhythmic tangent that skips in a sound universe stuffed with synth to droning waves. Of this fine movement, animated of a warm synth life, frees tones of felted sirens which criss-cross a spatial nebulosity grabble with permutated sequences and fabulous solos of a poetic delicacy. Jeffrey Koepper's musical world is in constant harmony with a warm and boiling spatial music. Euphony made aptly by his analog equipment and his personal vision of a quixotic cosmos to shifting constellations.
This 6th studio opus from the American synthesist pursues his mythical collection of cosmic sounds elaborated from sound searches, analog equipments, a creative imagination and a strong work of composition. Quadranteon is divided into 4 parts: 2 are full of sequencing rhythmic lives and the other 2 are more atmospherics. It’s a musical skillful blend where the rhythm gets quieter nearby ambient tranquilities and where the listener plays with the 2 musical paradoxes that reign agreeably on Quadranteon. If Part I is slowly animated by a suavely progressive rhythm, Part II is plunging us into the spheres of a distant cosmos that we gravitate with a sweet sense of exhilaration, as an ascension slowed down by the effect of weightlessness. Arpeggios float in echo, orbiting slowly Quadranteon timeless stairway. The sound world is skillfully built. Dressed it is by super analog effects which sway lazily on nice slinky and waltzing strata as well as minimalism chords which show and trace out the celestial way to be followed. A length (it’s the first impression that we get) but delicious journey as astral as meditative which overflows on the wild and mordant Part III.
Juxtaposed synth waves float with romantic at the opening of Quadranteon’s best track. Part III is livening up on a synth to caustic reverberations, announcing a pace which hems with a felted heaviness. Linear and minimalism chords follow with a sober frenzy which is accentuating with a new layer of keys as much minimalism, but intertwined by more limpid ones. Part III becomes more ardent and fuses of melodious synth tones which are perfectly mixing up in this astral jungle filled of variables rhythmic pulsations that feed a structure more and more complex, all wrapped it is of heavy pads from a synth to multiple musical variances. A brief atmospheric moment cuts the track, which returns with a new rhythmic structure mainly bended on a beautiful bass sequence wrapped progressively by a synth as much vaporous as warm. It’s a very beautiful and powerful track that goes along analogical lineages of the French era with Jarre on Equinoxe and Frédéric Mercier on his delicious Music from France. It is in a peaceful spatial mood that Quadranteon is concluding, with the morphic and unctuous Part IV. There, where the effect of floating in our head is also omnipresent as on Part II, but in a shorter way. It’s a sweet and slow dark waltz where furtive cadenced glidings prevail on these binary measures. Nice and soft, warm and inviting! Reflecting in all this beautiful and poetic cosmic ode of Koepper who, year after year, invites us to his so unique analog musical rendezvous, in these days of digital EM.
If Jean Michel Jarre's first works appeal you the music of Jeffrey Koepper will do the same, except that it’s a bit more progressive and complex.


AIR SPACE MUSIC: 005

Sylvain Lupari (2009)
Cet article est disponible en Français sur le site de Guts of Darkness, dont je suis chroniqueur sous le nom de Phaedream:
http://www.gutsofdarkness.com/god/objet.php?objet=12609


Aucun commentaire:

Publier un commentaire