lundi 3 janvier 2011

POLLARD/DANIEL/BOOTH: Volume 4 (2010)

We may say that the musical adventure of Brendan Pollard, Michael Daniel and Phil Booth is alike from albums to albums, it remains that it’s always pleasant to listen some Pollard/Daniel/Booth. And this even if the trio doesn’t invent a thing and is taking pleasure to investigate and transcend limits that Tangerine Dream implants with the fabulous Phaedra. This 4th volume from this nostalgic England trio is always situated in the beacons of a retro Tangerine Dream. A Tangerine Dream from Phaedra and Ricochet eras, that the trio even slides here and there splendid samplings. Volume 4 is a nice album that will make the delights of Dream fans always so insatiable from the 70’s spirit.
Alpha Primitives begins this new musical adventure in the lands of Tangerine Dream with a long atmospheric intro. Moving waves, long breaths with chthonian resonances, schizophrenic whispers and keyboard keys which roam here and there among fragments of an apocalyptic synth, the intro of Alpha Primitives has to be accompanied by delicate herbs that we carefully inhale. It’s a slow intro which caresses a latent madness coming from a lot of sound samplings reviving musical souvenirs of distant period. At around the 8th minute point these wandering choirs float in a mellotron mist, while far off we hear this heavy wavy sequence. Coming out of the abysses, this sequence which furnishes the rhythms of Phaedra shakes Alpha Primitives inertia along with another sequential line which is binding to the initial, shaping a sublime sequence which permutates and scrolls in a fast stream beneath twisted and foggy synths. The sequence is splitting, subdividing a hyper nervous tempo which waves with frenzy beneath nice mellotron pads. A delight for Tangerine Dream fans, Phaedra period! This sequential storm calms down towards the 20th minute spot. There where everything returns to where it starts with the atmospheric intro. Sharply divided into 2 parts, Alpha Primitives embraces an atmospheric sweetness with crystal clear chords which are driven by the wind of mellotrons and more serene choirs. Guitar solos are dragging there. Beautiful solos which are hooking superbly to this desert atmosphere, just before that a sequence with nervous chords waves with heaviness, always caressing by passing soft memoirs of a youth forgotten in sequences, mellotrons and synth of the 70s.
Streams begins with chords of piano and keyboards which resound slowly in an oniric oblivion. Solitary notes which are strolling and scrolling such as musical stars beneath the airs of a soft fluty mellotron. An intro of reverie in a fauna of sparkling chords which dance and skip delicately around a mellotron and a synth which spreads mist, oniric flutes and twisted solos in an intro where the poetic sweetness is dissipating little by little to make room to nervous and wavy-like sequences which draw a rhythmic that we distinguish pretty well in Ricochet. Streams scrolls on samplings of The Call and Ricochet with its symphonic synths that are making duel to a guitar beneath a dreamlike sound background where keyboard keys sparkle as sound prisms which never tarnish. Hashra Simpel encloses this Tangerine Fest with a strange cosmic blues where Michael Daniel's guitar lays down delicate solos on a sequenced bass line, felted cymbals and discreet piano notes.
Yes Pollard Pollard/Daniel/Booth Vol.4 is a good album. An album imprints of a nostalgic tenderness and a sequential fury which comes out straight from the Tangerine Dream soils. Even if too much near the Dream roots and stuffed with nostalgic samplings, Alpha Primitives and Streams are two musical giants that we listen to them in loops and make us say … Ah if Tangerine Dream was told me, that would be that by Pollard/Daniel/Booth!

ENGLISH ELECTRONIC MUSIC COMPANY: EEMC 1013

Sylvain Lupari (2010)
Cet article est disponible en Français sur le site de Guts of Darkness, dont je suis chroniqueur sous le nom de Phaedream : http://www.gutsofdarkness.com/god/objet.php?objet=14064 

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